Daniel Box
By Daniel Box

The putter is the club which is used most during a round of golf, yet it is so often disregarded in favour of the glamour of sparkling new irons or ‘groundbreaking’ drivers.

Whilst putting is definitely an art, often referred to as a ‘game within a game’, there are a number of ways in which you can make life easier for yourself. Every golfer has a different grip, setup and stroke, and so there are different types of putter which will and won’t suit you.

Have a look at our five favourite putters of the year and see if there’s something here which sounds like it may be able to help you hole some more putts on the greens.

In no particular order:

Odyssey EXO #7 Putter

Odyssey EXO #7 Putter

What it's all about... The #7 is a part of the EXO range of mallet putters which claim that an increase in MOI of 40% translates to a much larger target thanks to the increase in ball speed consistency across the face. Callaway therefore say that it effectively makes the hole 140% larger whilst putting!

The tech... The White Hot Microhinge face insert aims to give more sound feedback than the original Microhinge insert by using a slightly firmer version of Callaway’s White Hot material behind the larger hinges.

Callaway say that the high MOI can create up to 20% more stability than in standard models due to more consistent ball speeds across the face. The dark parts of the perimeter of the head are made of heavier 17-4 stainless steel, whilst the red centre sections are made of 6061 milled aluminium which is about a third of the weight.

What we say... They are expensive but the classic shapes of the #7 and Rossie combined with the new face technology, high MOI design, striking looks and high quality finish justifies the high price tag and if they help you hole more putts then they will be worth every penny.

Top of the pile in the EXO putter range would be the #7. Not only does it sit and look the best, but it also felt the most stable.

Read the full review here

Ping Vault 2.0 Piper Putter

Ping Vault 2.0 Piper Putter

What it's all about... The Ping Vault 2.0 putters are an update on the original Ping Vault putter, but they are still based on the same premise of being milled from a single block of 303 Stainless Steel.

The tech... The grooves are deeper in the middle and then shallower as you move out towards the edges, so that there is more material to make contact with the ball to make up for the loss of speed from hitting off centre.

They have two weight ports in the sole that come as standard with steel weights, but through custom fitting these can be changed to 15g heavier tungsten weights or 15g lighter aluminium weights.

What we say... The Piper is another classic in a mallet shape and in the standard Stealth finish makes the long white site line really stand out at address. Like all the Vault 2.0 putters, the Piper gives a little 'tock' sound at impact from the grooved face and as you would expect from Ping, this is a very balanced putter.

Read the full review here

TaylorMade Spider Mini Putter

TaylorMade Spider Mini Putter

What it's all about... The popular Spider putter range has undergone another set of tweaks to fit the eyes of the tour pros in creating a high MOI mallet putter that suits better players, but can also be appealing to any level of golfer.

Continues the theme of so-called ‘tour profile’ equipment which tends to be smaller and sleeker than the clubs aimed towards the average golfer.

The tech... As the name suggests the Mini has a 15% smaller head than the Spider Tour, mostly thanks to adjustments at the rear of the putter where the two 'rocket pods' have been removed.

They have been replaced on the back by two steel weights that are cast directly into each side of the head, in order to keep the high MOI forgiveness of the Spider design in a more compact head.

What we say... The Spider Mini looks great and the alignment lines really draw your focus to the strike of the ball, and combined with that better aluminium insert it creates a putter that may also surprise you with how well it performs.

Read the full review here

Odyssey Red Ball Putter

Odyssey Red Ball Putter

What it's all about... One of the key aspects of putting is getting your eye and hand position set up correctly. The Odyssey Red Ball Putter is specifically designed to help you achieve this.

The tech... Rising out of the sole on the putter is a little red ball and at address you can see it through a round scope that is on the crown of the putter. If you get your posture right and your eyes over the ball then the red ball will appear perfectly in the centre of the scope.

The head is a mallet that has an MOI that is 'in excess of 5300 g/cm2' which is high, giving you a bit of extra forgiveness. It has a slight toe hang to help those who have a little arc in their stroke.

What we say... This is one of the simplest and most fun-to-use alignment systems around. Focusing on using the red ball in practice and occasionally on the course might be the best way to use the Red Ball putter, which is yet another very good, high MOI mallet from Odyssey.

Read the full review here

Ping Sigma 2 Valor Putter

Ping Sigma 2 Valor Putter

What it's all about... The Ping Sigma 2 putters are an upgrade on the original Sigma G range that were launched in 2017. They feature new face material and groove design, but the main talking point is that they are, in fact, adjustable.

The tech... The really big difference with the Sigma 2 is something you can't really see and that is the mechanism under the grip that allows you to vary the length of the shaft from 32 to 36 inches in any increment you want.

With the Sigma 2 putters you adjust the length using a key. This fits in the top of the grip and as you turn it the grip effectively slides up and down the shaft until you get the length you want.

What we say... The addition of the variable length takes these putters to the next level with personal adjustability that is easy to use and understand.

The Valor is my favourite as I do like a face balanced mallet and the long alignment line on the back of the putter is something I like to use to help me line up.

Read the full review here

Summary

As this list shows, there are infinite different ways to get that ball into the hole and choosing one that feels comfortable for you requires you to get out and try a number of different putter shapes and styles.

So next time you think of heading down to the Pro Shop to look at the latest spacecraft-style driver which gains you 5 extra yards for hundreds of pounds more, have a think about your touch around the greens and whether that could be a much quicker, easier and cheaper way of lowering your scores.

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